The “X” Files

Me

I recently acquired a set of photographs which all seem to be of a Leeds based family. Many of them note the identity of the subjects on the reverse of the photograph. The person who owned the photographs and made the notes was a woman. We never see her own name but let’s call her Dana. On some of the photographs featuring groups of people she has marked the identity of certain group members with an “X.” It seems an odd thing to do because it spoils the photographs but it makes it easier to at least identify the relationships in this family.

Me Mam Dad Aunties Uncles

In the photograph above she uses Xs to identify a woman with a child on her knee and the man standing behind her. It’s difficult to see the “Xs” at this resolution but there are bigger versions in the Flickr album I’ve created of the whole collection. This couple must be the Dana’s parents as she tells us on the reverse “My mam with me on her knee Dad on the back row.”

Grandma X

Here’s another example of how Dana tells us that this is “My grandma with X on her chest.”

Betty 1943Betty2

Betty appears three times, once with Marjorie at Batley. Betty’s surname is given as “Raynor” on one of the photos. Is she Dana’s sister?

Young MarjorieMarjorie at staff danceMarjorie and Betty at Batley

Marjorie appears three times, once with Betty. Note there’s an “X” again to identify Marjorie in the group photo.

Blackie Binty and Dinkie

The family dogs are not forgotten – here we see Dinkie, Rinty and Blackie.

My cousin DorothyMy Auntie Florence

Here are Cousin Dorothy and Auntie Florence.

50 years with the same firm

I was hoping one of these gentlemen would turn out to be Dana’s father but she’s written on the back “John’s Father with his workmates from Yorkshire Copper Works.” There’s no clue as to who John is so it doesn’t help. Nevertheless the newspaper clipping provides fascinating detail.

Overall the collection illustrates some of the frustrations of collecting old photographs. Clearly there are intriguing stories behind them but nothing to definitively identify the subjects. From the notes and photography studio stamps we can place them in and around Leeds. Otherwise we can only be grateful for Dana’s “X”s to at least show some of the relationships.